Posts Tagged ‘environment’

BP's huge oil spill is about to hit land across the entire Gulf of Mexico

Something wicked this way comes

The Gulf of Mexico is murky, toxic and is literally a sea of despair. The video is harrowing. The threat to the environment, ecosystem and the seafood industry is alarming.

And yet, the silence from the Church on this travesty is deafening!

Why?

Aren’t we to be stewards over this planet? Do we not have dominion over the fish of the sea? Should we not protect the gifts God Almighty has bestowed upon us?

Then why does it seem the Church could care less about the tragic state of affairs in the Gulf of Mexico? As long as it doesn’t affect church attendance on Sunday, you’re cool?

This is far from a “liberal rant,” but rather as a child of God disgusted by his siblings when someone has just whizzed all over the gift Daddy bought me. Make no mistake – that is precisely what BP is doing as long as that spicket can’t get corked 30,000 leagues under the sea.

If you need any tug at your heart, consider these numbers, thanks to Newsweek:

  • 400 different species are being threatened by the oil
  • 7,000 square miles of federal fishing area has been closed because of the spill
  • $14 billion is the price tag of BP’s oil spill… so far
  • 3.5 million gallons of crude oil has been spilled in the Gulf. Helllloooo Exxon Valdez.

And none of that creates a prayer group, a vocal televangelist or even a reporter knocking on the door of any random pastor? Stunning.

An ichthus, a fish for Christ can swim in this oil and make a difference

It's time for us to swim upstream and make a difference

If anyone should be advocating the newly formed “Gulf Aid,” it should be the Body of Christ. We should be first in line to donate resources, offer time and pray for the near $1.6 billion in economy that has stopped to a grinding halt due to this mess. No deep horizons for those small business owners.

Seafood trade – done. Gulf restoration – back to the drawing board. Safety for the ecosystem – not a chance.

Hey, Church? Want a mission field? How’s the gulf sound right about now? You could send a team of volunteers to serve in the Gulf, do your part and help restore a broke, busted and disgusted economic system down there.

Listen, pastor of the Generic Church Assembly. I understand you are all bunched up about the immigration policies in Arizona, the health careless plan of Barack Obama and whatever else your cronies are babbling about around the water cooler, but this should matter to you and your congregation.

Why? Other than the aforementioned reasons rooted in theology, did you know Earth Day was actually not created by the far leaning left, but rather has a little to do with some right standing Pentecostal folks? In other words, God cares about this place so we should too!

Just think… five years after the worst natural disaster leveled the Gulf; the worst environmental disaster is about to topple that distinction. Meanwhile, can’t we at least pray for God’s hand to bring about healing and restoration here?

I challenge you to challenge your pastor about this issue. Folks, we need to pray. We need to take that dominion out for a spin and see what it can do.

And if that’s not enough, we need to do something. At least, that’s what the world would not expect.

I would love to disappoint them. Namely in this case.

P.S. If you know anyone in your church that was chanting, “Drill Baby Drill” during the last election. I would recommend a suggestion for you to said tool, “Go Clean Baby Clean.”

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Due to exploration and bad stewardship, the Jordan River could dry up in 2011

Pictures could be all we have left of the Jordan (Courtesy: Ivan Makarov)

From Genesis to the Gospel of John, Christians have become infatuated with the River Jordan. And rightly so.

This river has majestic meaning to the Body of Christ. From being parted for Joshua, Elijah and Elisha to Naaman being cured of leprosy, the Jordan River has been home to some of the most memorable and miraculous events in the Bible.

However, the most famous Jordan River marvel was the baptism of Jesus Christ by John the Baptist:

Then Jesus came from Galilee to John at the Jordan to be baptized by him. And John tried to prevent Him, saying, “I need to be baptized by You, and are You coming to me?” But Jesus answered and said to him, “Permit it to be so now, for thus it is fitting for us to fulfill all righteousness.” Then he allowed Him.

When He had been baptized, Jesus came up immediately from the water; and behold, the heavens were opened to Him, and He saw the Spirit of God descending like a dove and alighting upon Him. And suddenly a voice came from heaven, saying, “This is My beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased.” (Matthew 3:13-17 NKJV)

Glory to God! See there, that’ll preach. Needless to say, even if you are not an aficionado of Southern or Urban Gospel, this river is sacrosanct to the Church.  And so, when I read this story in Treehugger.com, I was highly perplexed:

Even the most famous and admired places aren’t immune to the problems of abuse and pollution – the Jordan River being a prime example as it’s expected to run dry by 2011 due to overexploitation, pollution and lack of regional management, according to Friends of the Earth, Middle East (FoEME).

Get that… Jesus’ river. Dry? To environmental stewards (of which, the entire Body of Christ should be), this is a harrowing story because this is another mighty body of water that has been destroyed because man was too lazy to care. This isn’t some “liberal rant”; this is ecological fact.

Not only is it historically significant but the river valley is also one of the world’s most important crossroads for migratory birds, with 500 million birds migrating twice a year.

The story continues to inform us that more than 90 percent of the river’s water has been diverted by Israel, Syria and Jordan, and what’s left is an unappealing mix of sewage, saline water, and run-off from cropland. Yet, we still go to the Holy Land in throngs recreating the aforementioned baptism of Christ unaware of this lamentable situation.

In 2011, that will no longer be possible so this is on your bucket list, call your travel agent today. However, there is a glimmer – albeit a miraculous ray – of hope:

According to FoEME, the river once had a flow rate of of 1.3 billion cubic metres a year, but now it trickles at less than 100 million cubic metres. The organization says that a rush of fresh water released into the river could save it.

This is how the Jordan River could end up if we don't act.

All it takes is a seed of faith. I've heard that somewhere before.

Is anyone preaching ahead of me here?

Wall Watchers, we are vessels of living water. And if we utilize the power of the Holy Ghost inside of us, why can’t we pray for that rush of “living water” (approximately 400 million cubic metres annually worth) to flow back into the same river that brought a well of God’s spirit to us?

On the last day, that great day of the feast, Jesus stood and cried out, saying, “If anyone thirsts, let him come to Me and drink. He who believes in Me, as the Scripture has said, out of his heart will flow rivers of living water.” (John 7:37-38 NKJV)

Why couldn’t this happen? Why wouldn’t this work? We have seen the Lord do so much more with so much less.

Sure, it may seem like an asinine thought, but the FoEME is devising a water management plan to help save the River Jordan. Why can’t Christians help? God did give us dominion over this earth; we can exercise it here in the Holy Land.

Still thick in vegetation, the Jordan River was more than a lifesource for people to eat, bathe and drink. It was a barrier of protection and a divine source of inspiration. Today, after this clarion call, helping restore this river should be our obligation.

It descends into the Sea of Galilee. From there, it travels 65 miles to the Dead Sea, but because of its meandering path, it travels 104 miles to get there. That’s a lot of space to cover, but nothing is too impossible for God (Luke 1:37).

I’ll get back to fun, yuks and fresh tags, but this distressing tale is certainly Writing on the Wall.

Pray to become better stewards of this planet. Pray to be mindful of ways to conserve our resources. Pray to exercise that dominion more actively. And pray for the restoration of the Jordan. Selah. Peace.

For years, certain megachurch pastors – event planners of the lukewarm pablum, if you will – have monochromatically aligned their proselytizing with about as much fervor as choosing the right socks to wear with an Italian suit.

You know, no passion but concerned with the aesthetics of it all.

PD*28795882Anywhoo, a big huzzah to the seeker-sensitive pastors of the world because all the cheerleading you do for a “good life” and a “better you” and the “best energy” God can muster has finally paid off.

Jesus caved in, left the right hand of his father, dawned some Levis and has become your official mascot thanks to bronze statue outside an East Sussex church in England and this story from The Telegraph (UK).

Here hangs our Lord, ravishing with some designer beach-bummin’ threads, hair flailing in the wind and rocking a major three-o-clock shadow.

Looking hot, J.C. Now, that’s my kind of Savior.

[Snap. Snap. Go in a circle. Snap.]

Father [David, of the Our Lady Immaculate and St. Philip Neri Catholic Church in Uckfield] Buckley said: “You are always looking for new ways to enrich people in the experience of Christianity and it is good people can be open-minded to appreciate it.

Sounds like a life preserver of spin control out of a reputation downfall to me.

Contemporary clothing. fresh locks, no grooming issues. Ah, there’s the rub.

People are in such a frentic rush to ensure Jesus can relate to modern-day issues that we push the envelope of sacrilege to present a Jesus is feeling a 21st century vibe.

NOW LOOK AT HIM?! Is that how he looked like carrying his hoist beam on the Via Dolorosa? Probably not, but I’m sure folk were complimenting his stylish Birkenstocks along those cobblestone streets.

No, that’s not in the Bible, but then again, neither is most of the drivel the aforementioned Kumbaya Klan shells out on Sundays. I’m just sayin’.

Capital vices. Cardinal Sins. Seven deadly sins. What. Ever.

The “Wicked Seven” [not an official pseudonym] are: lust, gluttony, greed, wrath, sloth, envy and pride. Many believe the Catholic Church pulled this list out of thin air, but Solomon may get all lathered up about that.

Call them what you will but these seven eventualities have been at the crux of the early Christian Church up to today, and evidently still giving us fits.

Take this story from the Las Vegas Sun (I know. I know. Insert your totally ironic joke here.) that discusses a study out of Kansas State University.

According to the study, each of the seven sins have certain geographic hubs within the United States. Because even Satan and his minions like to get their vacation on, I guess. Among the findings are:

Um, where do you live?

Um, where do you live?

> Lust, pride and wrath are big players below the Mason Dixon line.

Go figure. Folk got nothing better do while home on the range, so they believe they are cuter than they really are, cheat on their spouse and then end up mangled – or worse – for doing it. Sounds like a typical day at the office, eh?

> Greed is a coastal sin.

Imagine most places where big shipments can be delivered to the states – California and Washington (Pacific Ocean), Florida and New England (Atlantic Ocean) and Texas (Gulf of Mexico). You know, nose candy, hippie lettuce and any other peradventure that can be found on the black market. It’s the economy. Maybe sin just vacations with the upper crust. What do I know typing this from my trailer?

> Only three states really taste and see that the Lord is good.

Let’s see. Texas, the Carolinas and Tennessee. Anyone see a trend? I don’t know about you, but I’m about to buy stock in barbecue. Lawd, have mercy!

Call it complacency. Maybe altruism. How about irresponsibilty?

But can you call a recent Pew Forum poll about the environment and white evangelicals’ response – or lack thereof – “Racism”?

Just something to think about

Just something to think about

Probably not, but it makes you think. According to the aforementioned poll, and a story from WOW News’ Faithworld, white folk hanging around in church blaming everyone else for the issues with the environment, except themselves.

Only 34 percent of “saved folk” believe a plummeting ozone layer has anything to do with human activity.

Question is: Why? Is there a connection between salvation and a sanctimonious mindset of eco-responsibility? “Well, God will take care of it. Excuse me, I have to go to work now in my Hummer.”

Overall the Pew Forum found that a plurality, or 47 percent, of the adult U.S. population accepts that there is solid evidence that the earth is warming because of human activities. Most scientists have reached the conclusion that the planet’s climate is changing because of human-induced factors, notably the emissions from burning of  the fossil fuels that drive the global economy.

I’m not suggesting we all tie a yellow person… er, ribbon around the old oak tree, but maybe we all need to take some accountability with this environment thing? We do have dominion over this place, and before it stands still and Keanu Reeves is giving gruff voice and mad scowl (sorry, just saw the remake), we do need to remember:

The earth is the Lord’s and the fullness thereof (Psalm 24:1)

Or if you are slightly more cynical about how mankind has dealt with this place called Earth… littering, polluting and confabulating…

I brought you into a fertile land to eat its fruit and rich produce. But you came and defiled my land and you made my inheritance detestable (Jeremiah 2:7)

Either way, the proof is in the pudding, and unless you begin eating it, it’s no wonder you don’t see any harm in throwing that wrapper from Mickey D’s out your window when no one is looking. Guess what? Someone is. Tsk. Tsk. Tsk.

If you are concerned about being saved and yet, an exception to the previously noted rule, check out either Christian Ecology or the Evangelical Environmental Network. I’m not a tree hugger, just a Jesus lover.

(Sorry, that’s the best I got to compare with “Hell no, I won’t go” or other rally cries. Peace.)